Father of Marysville school shooter convicted of gun charges #GunControlNow #Repeal2A

One illegally possessed firearm, a .40-caliber Beretta pistol, was used by 15-year-old Jaylen Fryberg to kill four classmates and wound a fifth. Jaylen then killed himself with the same handgun.

Raymond Fryberg, left, the father of the Washington state teenager who fatally shot four classmates and himself at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014, arrives at the federal courthouse in Seattle, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. Fryberg is on trial this week for six counts of illegally possessing firearms, including the one used in the shooting, while under a domestic violence restraining order that meant he was not allowed to have guns. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Raymond Fryberg, left, the father of the Washington state teenager who fatally shot four classmates and himself at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014, arrives at the federal courthouse in Seattle, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. Fryberg is on trial this week for six counts of illegally possessing firearms, including the one used in the shooting, while under a domestic violence restraining order that meant he was not allowed to have guns. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The father of the Marysville school shooter was found guilty of federal firearms charges in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

The father of the teen who killed four classmates at Marysville-Pilchuck High School last fall was convicted Tuesday of illegally possessing a half-dozen firearms, including the one his son used in the shooting.

Raymond Lee Fryberg Jr. was convicted of six counts of unlawful possession of a firearm. One of the firearms, a .40-caliber Beretta pistol, was used by 15-year-old Jaylen Fryberg to kill four classmates and wound a fifth. Jaylen then killed himself with the same handgun.
The federal jury deliberated for about a day after a three-day trial before U.S. District Judge James Robart.

The senior Fryberg appeared stunned by the verdict. He had tears on his cheeks as he huddled with his attorneys and family after the verdict was read.

Fryberg will remain free until sentencing, which is scheduled for Jan. 11. He faces up to 10 years in prison for each count.

Family members of some of the shooting victims sat behind the prosecutors when the verdict was read. They declined to comment as they walked in silence into an elevator on the 14th floor of the U.S. District Courthouse. After the doors slid shut, however, ebullient yells and whoops could be heard.

Fryberg’s Seattle attorney, John Henry Browne, said the criminal charges were retaliation for the school killings and had been “pushed by the families” of the victims.

While the school shooting was never mentioned during the trial, Browne said it hung over the proceedings like a pall.

“It was difficult to stay on task,” he said outside the federal courthouse.

While the sole issue was whether Fryberg knew he was barred from owning firearms, Browne said, prosecutors began their closing arguments Monday with a slideshow of the six firearms Fryberg had purchased, including the handgun used by his son.
“This was clearly piling on by the government,” said Browne, who intends to appeal the verdict.

A grand jury had alleged the senior Fryberg, a member of the Tulalip Tribes, purchased a number of firearms despite being the subject of a tribal domestic-violence protective order that had been issued in 2002. Fryberg, 42, pleaded no contest in tribal court to violating the order in 2012, according to federal prosecutors.

The government says that should have prevented him from purchasing firearms, but that flaws in the instant-background-check system allowed him to “slip under the screen” of several law-enforcement databases.

Prosecutors claimed Fryberg lied when he filled out firearms-purchase forms on which he declared, under penalty of perjury, that he had not been convicted of a domestic-violence crime.

During the trial’s closing arguments, Browne accused the government of appealing to the jury’s emotions by showing photographs of each of the six firearms — including the handgun used in the school shootings and two assault-style semi-automatic rifles — that Fryberg had purchased at the Cabela’s store in Tulalip after 2012.

Fryberg, Browne said, assumed the purchases were legal and pointed out that he was even able to obtain a concealed-carry permit for a handgun, which requires a more stringent background check than purchasing a firearm. Browne said Fryberg was never properly served with the protection order, and that there were questions about whether the order was ever filed with the court.
The police officer who was supposed to file it — who was the brother-in-law of Fryberg’s ex-girlfriend, who had sought the order — is dead.

Fryberg claimed he was never given a copy of the order and did not know it existed, despite his no-contest plea in 2012.

“He is not on trial for anything else,” Browne said. “Not for how many guns he owns,” or what they may have been used for. The government, he claimed, “is trying to turn this case into something it is not.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Ye-Ting Woo said the issue was not whether Fryberg was able to purchase the guns because of “gaps in the system,” including the fact that tribal-court domestic-violence protective orders and convictions often are not entered into national databases.

“The system relies on the purchasers to tell the truth,” she said.

The investigation into Fryberg’s gun ownership began in October 2014, when the FBI was trying to determine ownership of the gun that was used in the school shootings. The senior Fryberg had purchased that gun from Cabela’s in January 2013, a year after a permanent protective order against him had been filed in Tulalip Tribal Court, prosecutors said.
A search warrant filed in U.S. District Court stated that agents found several firearms lying unsecured in the home.

A 1,400-page report detailing the investigation into the school shooting said Jaylen Fryberg apparently brought the handgun to school in a backpack. He texted several friends to meet him in the lunchroom that day, Oct. 24, and also sent a text to his father and other family members detailing his funeral plans.

Minutes later in the cafeteria, Jaylen Fryberg pulled out the Beretta handgun from the backpack and shot five classmates, killing Zoe Galasso, Gia Soriano and Shaylee Chuckulnaskit, all 14, and Andrew Fryberg, 15. All were shot in the head.

Nate Hatch, 15, was shot in the jaw and spent about two weeks in Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center.

The report indicates that Fryberg was angry over a breakup with a girlfriend, as well as a fight he had with a fellow student in the days before the shooting.

However, the team of investigators said it could not determine a definitive reason for the shooting.

@nra Troll Nation: Infecting Gun Safety Dialogue With Lies

@nra Troll Nation: Infecting Gun Safety Dialogue With Lies

@NRA Trolls #Repeal2A #GunControlNow
@NRA Trolls #Repeal2A #GunControlNow

America: The Land Where God Saves & Satan Invests In Assault Weapons And High Capacity Magazines.

The @nra is a wholly owned subsidiary of the gun manufacturing industry inventing a right to bear arms that subverts the spirit and meaning of the American Constitution.

American Bar Association Calls for Repeal of Stand Your Ground Laws

American Bar Association Calls for Repeal of Stand Your Ground Laws
26 Mar 2012, Los Angeles, California, USA — Hundreds of LA residents joined together for the 1 Miiliion Hoodie March for Trayvon Martin.
The march started at Pershing Square in downtown L.A and ended at L.A. City Hall.
—(Copyright Ted Soqui/Corbis / APImages)

A new report by the national lawyers group finds that self-defense laws are racially-biased and provide “a low-cost license to kill.”

More than two years after the Trayvon Martin case inspired a re-examination of Stand Your Ground self-defense laws nationwide, an American Bar Association report to be published this week issues a sweeping condemnation of the policies, citing concerns about public safety and racial bias.

In its final findings after a study that began with a series of hearings around the country in early 2013, the ABA’s National Task Force on Stand Your Ground Laws urges that two dozen state statutes — which relieve shooters of a duty to retreat in the face of danger, even outside their homes — be repealed or significantly scaled back to curb what the task force calls “unpredictable, uneven” enforcement.

When the National Rifle Association and American Legislative Exchange Council began pushing for the self-defense laws more than ten years ago, they sought to protect crime victims from unwarranted prosecution for resisting a threat with force. But the bulk of the ABA’s report takes a decidedly critical look at what it concludes are the laws’ failings: that states with Stand Your Ground laws showed increases in homicides and saw no signs that the laws decreased other types of crime; that they foster a shoot-first mentality that provides “a low-cost license to kill,” especially when an armed confrontation involves race; and that they endanger police officers’ lives and deprive crime victims and innocent bystanders of justice by rewarding some shooters with criminal or civil immunity.

One expert quoted in the report’s conclusions called the laws a solution in search of a problem. “If our aim is to increase criminal justice system costs, increase medical costs, increase racial tension, maintain our high adolescent death rate and put police officers at greater risk, then this is good legislation,” Temple University’s Jerry Ratcliffe told the task force. “But if we are to use science and data and logic and analysis to drive sensible public policy, then there is no reliable and credible evidence to support laws that encourage stand your ground and shoot your neighbor.”

The report, an advance copy of which was provided to The Trace, largely echoes a preliminary version released last year, but with a new section detailing an extensive list of studies showing how racial stereotypes can influence behavior when people feel threatened enough to defend themselves with deadly force. As The Trace pointed out previously, the ABA’s task force found that racial stereotypes also influence the courts: a white shooter who kills a black victim is 350 percent more likely to be found justified in the use of lethal force than if the same shooter killed a white victim.

The report’s principal author, University of Saint Thomas law professor Tamara Lawson, tells The Trace that the task force did not seek to take a political stand. Rather, it wants to help lawmakers make better policy based on the testimony and studies it compiled. “There was not a lot of legislative history available in the states that enacted Stand Your Ground,” Lawson says.

Of the 33 states providing murder and assault defendants with Stand Your Ground protections, nine do so through court-made rules while 24 have enacted statutes since Florida’s, the first in the nation, was passed in 2005.

The ABA, a voluntary national organization of lawyers and law students, plays no official role in setting legal policy, but its views can prove influential. The ABA’s House of Delegates, its governing body made up of regional representatives, approved the task force’s recommended policy changes at a meeting in February. Those recommendations include:

  • Calling a halt to passing more such laws, and repealing those that are on the books.
  • Failing that, amending laws to no longer grant immunity or allow use of Stand Your Ground protections in cases where the shooter is the “initial aggressor” or the target is a police officer.
  • Developing safeguards to “prevent racially disparate impact and inconsistent outcomes” that favor whites over blacks.
  • Develop clearer jury instructions to resolve confusion over the laws’ provisions.
  • Train police officers to be better able to decide whether to file criminal charges.
  • Create a national database to track the handling of Stand Your Ground cases nationwide and train gun owners on the rules of self-defense.

The ABA commissioned the study in the months between Martin’s death in Florida in February 2012 and the July 2013 acquittal of George Zimmerman, the Neighborhood Watch volunteer who successfully claimed self-defense for shooting the unarmed teen. Citing the controversial case, the report says the ensuing efforts by a variety of legal and political critics to repeal or scale back the laws have failed in at least 10 states — a trend the task force seeks to reverse.

The task force took pains to avoid characterizing the report as strictly a response to the Martin shooting. But Lawson has called the Martin case a critical turning point in re-assessing Stand Your Ground laws. Even though Zimmerman ultimately did not seek Stand Your Ground immunity, Lawson blamed Florida’s law for authorities’ initial decision not to charge him with murder, which she said further enflamed public opinion over the shooting. Writing in the University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy, Lawson placed the case in “the long tradition of impunity that historically followed the unprovoked killing of Black men in America” and urged that Florida and other states rethink their laws.

@nra Myths Guns are used for self-defense. Firearms are used far more often to intimidate than in self-defense. #GunControlNow #Repeal2A

@nra Myths Guns are used for self-defense. Firearms are used far more often to intimidate than in self-defense. #GunControlNow #Repeal2A

@nra Myths Guns are used for self-defense. Firearms are used far more often to intimidate than in self-defense. #GunControlNow #Repeal2A
@nra Myths Guns are used for self-defense. Firearms are used far more often to intimidate than in self-defense. #GunControlNow #Repeal2A

@nra Myths Guns are used for self-defense. Firearms are used far more often to intimidate than in self-defense. #GunControlNow #Repeal2A

@NRA Myths “Guns Make Homes Safer” #GunControlNow #Repeal2A #GunSense

@NRA Myths “Guns Make Homes Safer” #GunControlNow #Repeal2A #GunSense  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9715182

Guns kept in homes are more likely to be involved in a fatal or nonfatal accidental shooting, criminal assault, or suicide attempt than to be used to injure or kill in self-defense.

@NRA Myths “Guns Make Homes Safer” #GunControlNow #Repeal2A #GunSense  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9715182    Guns kept in homes are more likely to be involved in a fatal or nonfatal accidental shooting, criminal assault, or suicide attempt than to be used to injure or kill in self-defense.
@NRA Myths “Guns Make Homes Safer” #GunControlNow #Repeal2A #GunSense http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9715182
Guns kept in homes are more likely to be involved in a fatal or nonfatal accidental shooting, criminal assault, or suicide attempt than to be used to injure or kill in self-defense.
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